Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
Survivors of the deep by JWArtwork Survivors of the deep by JWArtwork
In spite of the spectacular discovery of a longer time range of the existance of Hybodus, it, just as the dinosaurs, pterosaurs and most marine reptiles, went extinct at the big K-T extintion-event. But not all hybodontids suffered that much from the extinction and some made it through to the Cenozoic. Fossils of the giant hybodontid Ptychodus were found in Paleocene strata of 61.7 million years old. But finally it seemed the succesful line of hybodontids had ended, until, in Early-Miocene strata in Sri-Lanka, the fossils of a close relative of Hybodus himself (even within the Hybodontidae) were uncovered: Miosynechodus.

You might have been wondering what a relatively modern-looking turtle and these ancient hybodont sharks might have been doing in the same image. The turtle is Miocaretta, a close relative of the extant genus Caretta. Just as in Miosynechodus, its name clarifies it’s indeed from Miocene strata, not a strange time for an extinct loggerhead. It is not the only animal found at the place with modern relatives. The fossil site also revealed fossils of Hemipristis serra, an extinct weasel shark, Miodugong, a Miocene dugong, and Miotestudo, another Miocene turtle with modern relatives.

In the large amount of fossils from invertebrates, bony fish, sharks, turtles and marine mammals one particular animal jumped out. They were the fossils of Miosynechodus. It was most surprising to see this ancient survivor living amongst the many nearly-modern animals. Just like Hybodus, Miosynechodus is a hybodontid, a member of a long-lived group of primitive sharks. Hybodontids likely originated out of Ctenacanthids and probably gave rise to the modern Euselachii (which includes most, if not all, modern sharks, and possibly also rays).

Unfortunately due to the cartilage skeletons of sharks, many of their remains vanish over time… Although there was too little information on the fossils of Miosynechodus, it’s likely all fossils found were teeth (and maybe a fin-spike, or two). All known information on the diet of Miosynechodus is that it likely hunted small animals such as small fish and maybe crustacians or even smaller organisms floating in the water. I was unable to find much information on the creature, even though I scanned the whole internet. My interpretations on the creature’s appearance, size and lifestyle are therefore extremely speculative, mostly based on Hybodus itself. This lack of information has one advantage: this is the first ever drawing of Miosynechodus to be published on the internet.

The last thing I want to remind you guys of is to keep in mind sharks are becoming increasingly threatened. Fishing for fins in the shark-fin soup, as well as sharks getting stuck in the nets of fishermen and many other things causes the shark population to drastically decrease. Are money and trophies worth more than seeing these creatures swimming in the wild and interacting with nature, just as they've done for 400 million years? Please support the sharks and other fish and don't help to disrupt the cycle. Please think before you eat, buy or catch.

So I guess you guys now know where the turtle in my avatar comes from! ;p I hope you guys enjoyed another obscure species being portrayed for the first time on the internet. As always comments, feedback and critiques are appreciated much! :nod: And now I wish you all a good… well, that’s hard to tell… I’ll just wish you a happy next 24 hours! ;)

Regards!!

P.S. First Miosynechodus AND Miocaretta in DA!!! :dance:
Add a Comment:
 
:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2014
What is up with hybodonts? They lived through no less than three major mass extinctions (Permian, Triassic, K-T) and five smaller mass extinctions. Since when does a single lineage live so long?
Reply
:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2014  Professional General Artist
What were your sources for this?
Reply
:icontablelander:
tablelander Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
these too are similar to modern day thresher sharks
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, they are also from the same family as the other one, though both are way more primitive than thresher sharks of course! ;)
Reply
:icontablelander:
tablelander Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
of course
Reply
:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
FROM MY HOMELAND OF SRI LANKA?!?!??!?!??!?!?!??!!??!?!??! :faint: :faint: :faint: :faint:
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes! :D I thought I'd notify you, but I didn't do it after all, because I was afraid it would look like I would be begging for faves (which I didn't intend ;)).
Reply
:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm really amazed that Hemipristis serra lived around my country, I mean, it is a large shark right? And a HYBODONT!!!! Wow!
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Uhm, I don't know if Hemipristis serra was that large, but I'm not really an expert on it, actually! ;) And a CENOZOIC hybodont!!! :dance:
Reply
:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2014  Professional General Artist
Check the new chart I uploaded, it was fairly large.
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes I saw it. :nod:
Reply
:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Sep 14, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:faint:
Reply
:iconelectreel:
electreel Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2012
Amazing! :omfg:
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks a lot, my friend! :bow: I'm glad you like the result! :D
Reply
:iconelectreel:
electreel Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2012
Yeah! :D
Reply
:iconspace-commander:
space-commander Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Great job with the lighting! By the way, have you ever thought about trying armored fish?
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks! :) Armored fish you say:? You mean like placoderms:? I've got some placoderm-sketches standing. I could make it into a drawing once... ;)
Reply
:iconspace-commander:
space-commander Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Exactly :) The fish in Kanangar Prime's Great Ocean are more or less placoderms themselves. I'd love to see one of your placoderm creations, but if you're already planning something big I'm happy to wait.
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Then maybe you could once make a sculpt or a drawing of a Kanangarian fish! ;) Well, I can of course do that one time. I'm not really planning somthing big, but my vacation is about to end and I've got some collabs and commissions standing, and of course the Eofish-sharkweek-contest, so it might take a while before it's up, but I'll do my best! ;)
Reply
:iconspace-commander:
space-commander Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I appreciate the offer, but it sounds like you're going to be pretty busy. I think what I'll do is I'll make a Kanangarian fish sketch in a few weeks, and if you find that you're interested in taking it further in the future you're welcome to download it and paint over it. You've already made a lot of great art for me already and I really appreciate it, so I don't want to push you into doing something new until you feel you're ready for it.
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh, I might have been a little confusing in my previous comment :blush:, but I actually meant that I could do the placoderm drawing. But a Kanangarian fish also sounds interesting to me. So if you'll make a sketch, I'll make a sculpt of it or so. And of course I can find some time, like in my evening hours, when I'm done studying. It will just take a little longer than usual. ;)
Reply
:iconspace-commander:
space-commander Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
That's cool :) Kanangar and Teran fish pretty much had the same evolution up until the placoderm stage anyway so they would look identical. What I'm planning to sketch will basically be the equivalent of a Teran placoderm getting caught by a Trillaglazer ([link]), just a better drawing than the beginnerish painting you see in link :)

Also, take all the time you need. The Kanangar Project is very long term so I don't ever want you to feel like you need to rush. Plus, I have to study too, so I know where you're coming from ;)
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ok, I'll be awaiting your drawing then! ;)
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconadiraiju:
Adiraiju Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
VERY nice, particularly with the light textures on the Miosynechodus's back!
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks a lot! :bow: I'm glad my efforts paid off! It wouldn't work the first couple of times I tried! ;)
Reply
:iconadiraiju:
Adiraiju Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Certainly!
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:w00t:
Reply
:iconevenape:
Evenape Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Miocene hybodonts? That's surprising!
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, it surely is! :D I've even read about possible remains of Pleistocene hybodonts, but I guess these are too fragmentary to be sure... :worry:
Reply
:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2014  Professional General Artist
Forget I asked, the references are online, just not much.
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, there are a few references, tho they are very poor. =/ As I said, my drawing is extremely speculative, just based on the average hybodont shark.
Reply
:iconevenape:
Evenape Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Well, if it is true, it would be another species killed by the climate change... (Still amazing though, since they actually outlived those albanerpetonid "amphibians"...)
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, though I there is incredibly less information on it, even less than Miosynechodus, so it might be another mistake of the Paleobiology database. ;) And what about the albanerpetonid amphibs:? Did they last so long:?
Reply
:iconevenape:
Evenape Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I hope not though, those scientists ought to have a reason to assign them to Hybodontidae...

They survived for 160 million years, from Mid Jurassic to the Pliocene...
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, sometimes they are very unsure about it, though. And as we saw before, the paleobiology database, does make mistakes now and then... :(

Ah, I see... Thanks for the information then! :)
Reply
:iconevenape:
Evenape Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
True, well, humans aren't perfect :D

You're welcome :)
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, in any case, I do expect more spectacular discoveries to come, whether or not they involve hybodonts! :) And if it all seems to be misinterprented, then at least we still have Miosynechodus, which is already a spectacular discovery, I think! ;)
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2012  Hobbyist
Wow. :o The information this time is even better than the your Hybodus! It's another survivor from ancient times in the Miocene, like Lazzarosuchus :)
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes it is! :nod: And like Barinasuchus! ;)
Reply
:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2012  Hobbyist
Indeed. Also I didn't know that your avatar were a turtle (actually I thought that it could be some kind of seal or a placodont) :)
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, now you can see the image a little bigger, but my turtle looks kinda crappy, so that's probably why! ;)
Reply
:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2012  Hobbyist
Well, not crappy, but in the avatar it's difficult to see the shell. Maybe you could paint it of another color :)
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah, I can imagine why... :) I might change the avatar some time indeed. ;)
Reply
:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2012  Hobbyist
Ok, in fact it's not a big change, only colour. :)
By the way, I wondered if you can help me with a Wikipedia article? I mean, you can translate this to English: [link] :?
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
No problem! ;) Allright here we go:

The Dsungaripteridae are a group of pterosaurs belonging to the Pterodactyloidea.

In 1964 Young created a family to place the recently found Chinese genus Dsungaripterus. Later on, also Noripterus and “Phobetor” (a name which was already occupied, therefore the quotation marks) were assigned to the family.

In 2003, Alexander Kellner gave the exact definition as a clade: the group was composed out of the latest common ancestor of Dsungaripterus, Noripterus and “Phobetor”, and all its descendants. As synapomorphies he gave the next six characteristics: a relatively small eye-socket, which is placed high up the skull; an opening below the eye-socket; a high ridge across the snout, which starts in front of the nasal opening and ends behind the eye-sockets; the maxilla reaches out down- and backwards; the absence of teeth in the first part of the jaws; the teeth in the back of the upper jaw are the biggest; the teeth have a wide oval basis. Kellner pointed out all members of the group, except for Dsungaripterus itself, were known from fragmentary remains, so only the last characteristic could be established for sure in all members.

Also Domeykodactylus and Lonchognathosaurus were assigned to the group. They are medium-sized forms, adapted to eating hard-shelled creatures, which they grind with their flat teeth.

In the same year, David Unwin gave a slightly different definition: the last common ancestor of Dsungaripterus weii and Noripterus complicidens, and all its descendants.

The known Dsungaripteridae range from the Late-Jurassic (Berriasian) to the Cretaceous (Hauterivian). The group belongs to the Dsungaripteroidea sensu Unwin and is presumably relatively closely related to the Azhdarchoidea. According to Unwin, Germanodactylus is the sister taxon to the group, but his analyses have this outcome as the only ones. According to an analysis by Brian Andres from 2008, the Dsungaripteridae are closely related to the Tapejaridae, what would actually make them members of the Azhdarchoidea.

You're gonna have to do the coding yourself, though! ;p Haven't actually done anything on Wikipedia for a long time... Maybe I should pick it up again... :hmm:
By the way, how is the collab going:? I'm not wanting to hurry you up, though, just interested in the progress! ;)
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconpalaeorigamipete:
palaeorigamipete Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
fantastic! =)
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Haha, glad you think so! :D
Reply
:iconpalaeorigamipete:
palaeorigamipete Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I sure do! =)
Reply
:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Great! Then I guess my efforts paid off! :D
Btw, I'll be submitting this one to the contest as well! ;)
Reply
:iconpalaeorigamipete:
palaeorigamipete Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
cool! =)
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×
  • Art Print
  • Canvas
  • Photo




Details

Submitted on
August 27, 2012
Image Size
1.5 MB
Resolution
1599×1958
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
933
Favourites
35 (who?)
Comments
65

License

Creative Commons License
Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
×